Pakistan and India Should Be Intervened As Soon As Possible

US Secretary of State Donald Trump insisted that tensions over Kashmir should be rescheduled and that Pakistan and India should be intervened as soon as possible, diplomatic observers said. At the White House meeting with Prime Minister Imran Khan on July 22, President Trump urged Narendra Modi, India's Prime Minister, to resolve the 70-year-old Kashmir dispute, arguing that he wanted to become an arbitrator did.

US president to assume this role

Though India denied the US president to assume this role, Trump repeated his proposal Thursday, pointing out that the controversy had not been resolved for too long. India has recently rejected proposals, although Prime Minister Khan told Trump that he would bring "more than one billion people's prayers" if he brought peace to the region. At the same time, two major developments have taken place, and the need for third party intervention in Washington this week was felt.

Michael Kugelman said, "In the next few days or weeks we will be able to make two major developments that can make a significant contribution to regional stability. Kugelman, the South Asian affairs director at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, pointed out that one of these developments could bring peace to Afghanistan, while the other could increase tension between the two nations in the region.

The first development was the US - Taliban negotiation "promoted by Pakistan, which (presumably) leads to a future Afghanistan government with the Taliban role," he wrote. The other is "Abolition of India against Kashmir (in Article 35 of the Indian Constitution)," he said, adding that he could turn the divisive territory into a separate Indian country.

This is a serious problem, Kugelman warned

US media also highlighted the Kashmir issue on Sunday, pointing out that the latest tensions between Pakistan and India depend on the Indian government to withdraw tourists and Hindu pilgrims and build up troops in the region. A report in the Washington Post noted that Kashmir's fears of destroying India's constitutional provision that banned Kashmir residents from buying land in the majority of Islamic territories sparked fears.

The New York Times also quoted the report as saying that "India recently deployed at least 10,000 troops in Kashmir, and there are 25,000 media outlets in one of the most militarized areas in the world. According to the content posted on social media, the abolition of the constitutional provision protecting Kashmir's position warned the region of its fire. The source speculated that one of the main reasons for India could be disappointed with Pakistan 's recovery in Afghan peace process.

The news was also concerned about Washington's decision to resume Pakistan's relationship with the United States and resume repairs and modifications of Pakistan's F-16 fighter planes. Several posts also said at a recent parliamentary hearing that Gen. A. Milley, the US military's designated representative, maintains strong ties with the Pakistani military.

The Post and the New York Times report pointed out that recent rises are among "suggestions by President Trump to mediate to resolve the Kashmir problem. US media have pointed out that other governments have also issued travel advisories calling on their citizens to leave India's Kashmir.

Earlier this year, the report pointed out that Prime Minister Bharatiya Janata of the Indian prime minister promised to abolish special rights to the Kashmiri people in accordance with the Indian constitution. Indian troops disarming Kashmir police soldiers and setting up local police, rumors circulating throughout the region on Aug. 15, before India's independence day, about full-scale military crackdowns.

United Nations to protect the cargo ships

The United States is struggling to unite the United Nations to protect the cargo ships that cross the Strait of Hormuz, allies concerned about the conflict with Iran. Tensions increased in the Gulf region in May 2018 after the United States decided to withdraw its groundbreaking agreement to restrain Iran's nuclear program and resume sanctions. However, European nations were adamant about the US plan to send an army escort, despite the fact that a series of vessels flocked to a narrow maritime passage that is essential for world crude oil supplies.

On Sunday, Australia became the newest ally that seemed to give the plan to a large bed. Defense Secretary Linda Reynolds said in an interview with the State Department's Secretary of State that "very serious and complex" requests would be "very serious considerations. We are deeply concerned about tensions in the region, and we strongly condemn the attack on Omani shipping," Reynolds said. 

She told Mike Pompeo and newly identified Defense Secretary Mark Esper, As we always do, we will ultimately determine our own sovereign interests as we do. "He said. We will discuss the matter at the ministerial meeting, but we have not made a decision yet." Washington recalled the idea of ​​a navy alliance that attacked several times in the Gulf war in June. Tehran condemned Iran.

The plan was to force each army to provide military escort to their ships by providing security measures, monitoring operational areas, and providing command and control. Pompeo had a strange confrontation with the reporter's question of lack of enthusiasm from Australia, claiming that "we are confident we will have a global coalition.

There is a lot of dialogue in every country

Esper, meanwhile, said the United States has "got a lot of responses" and "there will be a forthcoming announcement. Referring to the prospect of Europe's only cooperation, Esper attempted to divide. I think that the purpose is the same whether it is carried out under US command and control, or someone else, or an operation carried out by European partnership.

Paris, Berlin and London are planning to coordinate and share information in the Gulf region to enhance maritime security, but they will not deploy additional assets, the French said. Secretary of Defense of Florence.
Previous Post
Next Post

0 comments: